[[ epub pdf ]] Crossing the Kingdom: Portraits of Saudi ArabiaAuthor Loring M Danforth – Albawater.co

For many people, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia evokes images of deserts, camels, and oil, along with rich sheikh in white robes, oppressed women in black veils, and terrorists But when Loring Danforth traveled through the country in , he found a world much complex and inspiring than he could have ever imagined With vivid descriptions and moving personal narratives, Danforth takes us across the Kingdom, from the headquarters of Saudi Aramco, the country s national oil company on the Persian Gulf, to the centuries old city of Jeddah on the Red Sea coast with its population of undocumented immigrants from all over the Muslim world He presents detailed portraits of a young woman jailed for protesting the ban on women driving, a Sufi scholar encouraging Muslims and Christians to struggle together with love to know God, and an artist citing the Quran and using metal gears and chains to celebrate the diversity of the pilgrims who come to Mecca Crossing the Kingdom paints a lucid portrait of contemporary Saudi culture and the lives of individuals, who like us all grapple with modernity at the dawn of the twenty first century


10 thoughts on “Crossing the Kingdom: Portraits of Saudi Arabia

  1. Margaret Sankey Margaret Sankey says:

    In 2012, Danforth, an anthropologist at Bates College, took a study abroad group to Saudi Arabia This is the collection and recollection of his interviews with people willing to talk to him While there is some interesting stuff here, like the view of the Aramco compound and its sheltered 1950s suburban feel, the basic problem is that he was in Saudi Arabia for a month just long enough to become fascinated, but far too short to develop a feel for the real lives of the people he s writing about In 2012, Danforth, an anthropologist at Bates College, took a study abroad group to Saudi Arabia This is the collection and recollection of his interviews with people willing to talk to him While there is some interesting stuff here, like the view of the Aramco compound and its sheltered 1950s suburban feel, the basic problem is that he was in Saudi Arabia for a month just long enough to become fascinated, but far too short to develop a feel for the real lives of the people he s writing about


  2. Peter Peter says:

    This is the book to read if you want to understand modern Saudi Arabian culture Danforth is an experienced anthropologist who knows how to avoid a lot of the stereotypes that fill the media about Islam in general and especially Saudi Arabia The book is organized around different topics, including the ban on women driving, Aramco s history, and exclusion of non Muslims from the Hijaz region and the hajj Each chapter includes personal stories from interviews, as well as research that gives the This is the book to read if you want to understand modern Saudi Arabian culture Danforth is an experienced anthropologist who knows how to avoid a lot of the stereotypes that fill the media about Islam in general and especially Saudi Arabia The book is organized around different topics, including the ban on women driving, Aramco s history, and exclusion of non Muslims from the Hijaz region and the hajj Each chapter includes personal stories from interviews, as well as research that gives the big picture background you need to understand what is going on It s both the work of a scholar who knows what he s doing and highly readable and entertaining book Strongly recommend


  3. Brownguy Brownguy says:

    There were quite a few interesting stories that Danforth got into but the conclusion really didn t land with the kind of punch that I was hoping for I think if you re looking for an interesting primer on modern Saudi Arabia, you could do worse This is a solid casual read.


  4. Phi Beta Kappa Authors Phi Beta Kappa Authors says:

    Loring M Danforth BK, Amherst College, 1971AuthorFrom the publisher For many people, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia evokes images of deserts, camels, and oil, along with rich sheikh in white robes, oppressed women in black veils, and terrorists But when Loring Danforth traveled through the country in 2012, he found a world muchcomplex and inspiring than he could have ever imagined With vivid descriptions and moving personal narratives, Danforth takes us across the Kingdom, from the headq Loring M Danforth BK, Amherst College, 1971AuthorFrom the publisher For many people, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia evokes images of deserts, camels, and oil, along with rich sheikh in white robes, oppressed women in black veils, and terrorists But when Loring Danforth traveled through the country in 2012, he found a world muchcomplex and inspiring than he could have ever imagined With vivid descriptions and moving personal narratives, Danforth takes us across the Kingdom, from the headquarters of Saudi Aramco, the country s national oil company on the Persian Gulf, to the centuries old city of Jeddah on the Red Sea coast with its population of undocumented immigrants from all over the Muslim world He presents detailed portraits of a young woman jailed for protesting the ban on women driving, a Sufi scholar encouraging Muslims and Christians to struggle together with love to know God, and an artist citing the Quran and using metal gears and chains to celebrate the diversity of the pilgrims who come to Mecca.Crossing the Kingdom paints a lucid portrait of contemporary Saudi culture and the lives of individuals, who like us all grapple with modernity at the dawn of the twenty first century