Looking for Lost Bird: A Jewish Woman Discovers Her Navajo Roots pdf epub – Albawater.co

This is an unusual view of the Navajo culture It s not written by an anthropologist, a missionary, or a scholar Rather it s the view of someone who tries to assimilate into the culture when all she s known for 43 years is the Indian stereotype She shares her thoughts as she makes the adjustment I d like to know if this is her voice or that of the co author And, I d like to know how she s doing now, almost 20 years after this book was written Now that DNA testing iswidely available, This is an unusual view of the Navajo culture It s not written by an anthropologist, a missionary, or a scholar Rather it s the view of someone who tries to assimilate into the culture when all she s known for 43 years is the Indian stereotype She shares her thoughts as she makes the adjustment I d like to know if this is her voice or that of the co author And, I d like to know how she s doing now, almost 20 years after this book was written Now that DNA testing iswidely available, her search for her roots would have been different today I wonder if she and her supposed twin have submitted samples for testing p 22 Navajos wait for the baby s first laugh It has to be spontaneous and self generated no kitchy kooing and no tickling allowed It usually happens when the baby is a month or so old And then they celebrate Unlike the baptism of Christians or the ceremonies of the Jewish peoples, this is a joyous celebration based on the baby s development.p 60 The Navajos did not challenge nature or try to interfere with it Their task was to be stewards of the land and caretakers of the animals, the birds, even the snakes who lived on it They did not think about building dams or changing the course of ancient rivers or moving on to a greener place Instead, they looked for ways to live in harmony with the reality of the world as it was.p 179 I was a casual housekeeper, but Navajos are serious about neatness and sticklers over cleanliness.This is probably a 3.5 star book, but I decided to round up because it kept my attention I ve read enough about the Navajo s to give me some context for this story It was the subtitle, A Jewish Woman Discovers her Navajo Roots, that really grabbed my interest in this book It sounds improbable, but this is a true story, well told Yvette and her twin brother were born on the Navajo Reservation of Indian parents, but were stolen from the hospital and sold on the black market Separated from her brother, Yvette was adopted by a well to do Jewish couple in Florida Until her adoptive other died, life was smooth for Yvette, but her adoptive father turned ag It was the subtitle, A Jewish Woman Discovers her Navajo Roots, that really grabbed my interest in this book It sounds improbable, but this is a true story, well told Yvette and her twin brother were born on the Navajo Reservation of Indian parents, but were stolen from the hospital and sold on the black market Separated from her brother, Yvette was adopted by a well to do Jewish couple in Florida Until her adoptive other died, life was smooth for Yvette, but her adoptive father turned against her and she was out on her own Contacted tears later by her Navajo sister on the Internet, Yvette and her husband and two daughters pulled up their roots in Maine and drove to Arizona to live on the reservation This story has its share of coincidences, but it rings true and I learned a lot about life on an Indian Reservation in the twentieth century Eventually they find the twin brother as well This book didn t grab me as much as I thought it would, while an interesting premise, the book came to no conclusions Not sure if the issue is that I am recovering from illness and my overall sense of malaise is interfering with my level of interest, or if personal narrative is difficult and this book was written at at time when Yvette was still discovering her story. This is the true story of Yvette Melanson, a woman who along with her twin was stolen as a baby She was adopted and raised by a Jewish family She was loved, taken care of and taken to dance classes and piano lessons by her adoptive mother Yvette had always questioned where she came from her, but her life was good and she was happy.But then at age 13 her adoptive mother passes away Rejection and grief follow Yvette goes out on her own, going to Israel, joining the army and eventually meeting This is the true story of Yvette Melanson, a woman who along with her twin was stolen as a baby She was adopted and raised by a Jewish family She was loved, taken care of and taken to dance classes and piano lessons by her adoptive mother Yvette had always questioned where she came from her, but her life was good and she was happy.But then at age 13 her adoptive mother passes away Rejection and grief follow Yvette goes out on her own, going to Israel, joining the army and eventually meeting her husband, Dickie.But for her whole life, Yvette has always asked the questions Who I am and Where do I come from She begins to search for her birth parents using the internet She eventually finds a woman who she learns is her sister And Yvette also finds out that she is Navajo.Yvette s story is fascinating and I found that I couldn t put the book down I wanted to know about Yvette, her life and her journey to find out who she is.In this book Yvette takes you on her long and tough journey to finding out who she is and where she belongs.The story is inspiring Yvette never gave up trying to find her family In some ways I was able to relate to Yvette, in that she was trying to learnabout her family and heritage Some things took time for her, some things were strange and sometimes she had her doubts if she d ever be able to fit in with the Navajo people She worries about her husband and her daughters, they left everything behind for her to be with her family But in the end, Yvette finds peace and finds that she along with her husband and daughters fit in, that they belong.I just thought the book was wonderful and I enjoyed every word, every page and every chapter I m happy that Yvette Melanson decided to share her story with others I know I ve learned and taken a lot from this book and I believe that if others read this book, they will too A story about a woman who grows up always slightly confused about her identity, feeling as if something as missing This may be a feeling that many adopted children know However, she soon discovers that she s a child that was stolen from Navajo parents sent away to be raised Jewish by a white family in a time when hospitals and other officials had networks that ushered native children away from their homes This is her journey about finding her Navajo family, moving to learnabout her i A story about a woman who grows up always slightly confused about her identity, feeling as if something as missing This may be a feeling that many adopted children know However, she soon discovers that she s a child that was stolen from Navajo parents sent away to be raised Jewish by a white family in a time when hospitals and other officials had networks that ushered native children away from their homes This is her journey about finding her Navajo family, moving to learnabout her identity, and the trials she faces along the way Three stars because the writing is underdeveloped in many areas If you re going to work with a ghost writer, get a good ghost Note This was adapted into a Hallmark special which I have not seen for those interested in adaptation literature An interesting memoir about a woman, adopted in by a Jewish family in the 1950s, who discovers that she and her twin brother were stolen from a Navajo family She moves to the reservation to explore her heritage.This was a quick read, written in a simple manner I was fascinated by her descriptions of her life on the reservation, as well as her mention of the time she lived in Israel after high school Melanson has certainly had an interesting life But I never really connected with the story t An interesting memoir about a woman, adopted in by a Jewish family in the 1950s, who discovers that she and her twin brother were stolen from a Navajo family She moves to the reservation to explore her heritage.This was a quick read, written in a simple manner I was fascinated by her descriptions of her life on the reservation, as well as her mention of the time she lived in Israel after high school Melanson has certainly had an interesting life But I never really connected with the story there was just something distant about the narration.Apparently Melanson and her brother are only two of many Lost Birds who were stolen from their Native American families Hopefullyof these lost birds will be able to use the Internet, as Melanson did, to eventually find their way home In this haunting memoir, Yvette Melanson tells of being raised to believe that she was white and Jewish At age forty three, she learned that she was a Lost Bird, a Navajo child taken against her family s wishes, and that her grieving birth mother had never stopped looking for her until the day she died I learned a part of Native American history that I d never heard about and I wasn t very surprised to learn As Americans and especially concerning the Native Americans we ve always thought we knew what was best for everyone we considered inferior I haven t made up my mind about how selfish this woman is only in respect to taking her children to such an impoverished and isolated area or how brave she was to give up everything she knew and jump at the chance to totally commit herself to im I learned a part of Native American history that I d never heard about and I wasn t very surprised to learn As Americans and especially concerning the Native Americans we ve always thought we knew what was best for everyone we considered inferior I haven t made up my mind about how selfish this woman is only in respect to taking her children to such an impoverished and isolated area or how brave she was to give up everything she knew and jump at the chance to totally commit herself to immersing in her heritage I commend her white husband for agreeing to take the plunge with her Also learned about history and rituals of the Navajos Minnie Bob, and her brother Bob Minnie, adopted at birth, find their way home to the Navajo reservation A first person narrative story, told by Claire Safran in a comfortable style I was fascinated by the poverty, overall family feeling, personal determination to succeed, and general personal gutsiness of Yvette as she clambers through several years of struggles to become comfortable with being a Navajo.I m looking forward to finding The Lost Child movie. Fascinating memoir of a Navaho woman, stolen as an infant and raised on Long Island by her Jewish adoptive family She lived many lives in 35 years This is the story of her return to her Native American roots Great read.